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Download the PDF of the 1965 War Between India and Pakistan in Urdu



The 1965 War Between India And Pakistan In Urdu Pdf Downloadl




The 1965 war between India and Pakistan was a major event in the history of South Asia. It was also a significant moment for Urdu language and literature, as it marked a turning point in the relations between the two countries and their cultural expressions. In this article, we will explore the causes, consequences and impact of the 1965 war on Urdu language and literature, and how it shaped the identity and aspirations of Urdu writers and speakers in both India and Pakistan.




1965 War Between India And Pakistan In Urdu Pdf Downloadl



Urdu is a language that originated in the Indian subcontinent, and has been influenced by various languages such as Arabic, Persian, Turkish, Hindi and English. It is written in a modified form of the Persian script, and has a rich literary tradition that dates back to the 18th century. Urdu is spoken by millions of people in India and Pakistan, as well as in other countries such as Bangladesh, Nepal, Afghanistan and the Middle East. Urdu is also one of the official languages of India and Pakistan, and has been a symbol of cultural unity and diversity for both nations.


However, Urdu has also been a source of conflict and controversy in the region, especially after the partition of India and Pakistan in 1947. The partition was a result of the demand for a separate homeland for the Muslims of India, who felt discriminated and oppressed by the Hindu majority. The partition led to massive violence, displacement and trauma for millions of people on both sides of the border. It also created a rift between the Urdu speakers of India and Pakistan, who had previously shared a common cultural heritage and identity.


The 1965 war was one of the several wars that erupted between India and Pakistan over various issues such as Kashmir, water resources and border disputes. The war lasted for 17 days, from September 6 to September 23, 1965. It involved air strikes, tank battles, artillery shelling and infantry combat. Both sides claimed victory, but neither side gained any significant territory or advantage. The war ended with a ceasefire brokered by the United Nations, and a peace agreement signed at Tashkent in January 1966.


The 1965 war had a profound impact on Urdu language and literature, as it triggered a wave of patriotic fervor and nationalist sentiment among both Indians and Pakistanis. Urdu writers and poets responded to the war with various forms of expression, such as poems, songs, stories, essays and speeches. Some of these works were supportive of their respective governments and armies, while others were critical of the war and its human cost. Some works were also aimed at promoting peace and harmony between the two countries, while others were more divisive and hostile.


In this article, we will examine some of the most prominent examples of Urdu literature that emerged during and after the 1965 war. We will also analyze how these works reflected the changing attitudes and perspectives of Urdu writers and speakers towards each other and their own countries. We will also discuss how these works influenced the future development of Urdu language and literature in both India and Pakistan.


Urdu Poetry and the 1965 War




One of the most prominent forms of Urdu literature that emerged during and after the 1965 war was poetry. Urdu poetry has a long and rich tradition of expressing various emotions and themes, such as love, beauty, sorrow, faith, rebellion, patriotism and social justice. Urdu poetry also has a variety of genres and forms, such as ghazal, nazm, qasida, marsiya, rubai, masnavi and geet. Urdu poets have used these forms to convey their personal and collective feelings and opinions on various issues and events, including wars and conflicts.


The 1965 war inspired many Urdu poets to write poems that reflected their views and sentiments on the war and its aftermath. Some of these poems were published in newspapers, magazines and journals, while others were recited at public gatherings and rallies. Some of these poems were also set to music and sung by popular singers and artists. Some of the most famous Urdu poets who wrote poems on the 1965 war include Faiz Ahmed Faiz, Ahmad Nadeem Qasmi, Habib Jalib, Munir Niazi, Ahmad Faraz, Akhtarul Iman, Majeed Amjad, Zafar Iqbal and Kishwar Naheed.


Some of these poems were supportive of the Pakistani cause and praised the bravery and sacrifice of the Pakistani soldiers and civilians. They also criticized the Indian aggression and condemned the international interference and betrayal. For example, Faiz Ahmed Faiz wrote a poem titled "Hum ke thehray ajnabi" (We who became strangers), in which he expressed his disappointment and disillusionment with the Tashkent agreement that ended the war. He wrote:


Hum ke thehray ajnabi itni madaraton ke baad


Phir banenge aashna kitni mulaqaton ke baad


Kab nazar mein aayegi bedagh sabze ki bahar


Khoon ke dhabbe dhuleinge kitni barsaton ke baad


We who became strangers after so much affection


Will become familiar again after how many meetings


When will we see the spotless spring of greenery


The stains of blood will wash away after how many rains


Another example is Ahmad Nadeem Qasmi's poem "Aik sipahi ki maa ko khat" (A letter to a soldier's mother), in which he wrote a letter from a soldier to his mother, telling her that he is proud to die for his country. He wrote:


Maa mujhe yeh khat likhte hue sharminda hon


Ke main tujhe apni jaan de kar khali haath hon


Maine teri godh mein so kar jo sapne dekhe thay


Un mein se kuch bhi poora na kar sakta raha


Magar maa tu fikar na kar main khush hoon bahut


Ke maine apne watan ko apna lahu diya hai


Mother I am ashamed to write this letter to you


That I am leaving you empty-handed by giving you my life


The dreams that I had seen while sleeping in your lap


I could not fulfill any of them


But mother do not worry I am very happy


That I have given my blood to my country


Some other poems were critical of the war and its human cost. They also questioned the validity and necessity of the war and its consequences. They also appealed for peace and harmony between the two countries. For example, Habib Jalib wrote a poem titled "Aisay dastoor ko" (This system), in which he denounced the war-mongering and propaganda of the rulers and politicians. He wrote:


Aisay dastoor ko subh-e-bay noor ko


Main nahin maanta main nahin jaanta


Main bhi khaif nahin takhta-e-daar se


Main bhi Mansoor hoon keh do aghyaar se


Kyun daraatay ho zindaan ki deewaar se


This system this dawn without light


I do not accept I do not recognize


I am not afraid of the gallows either


I am also Mansoor tell it to the enemies


Why do you scare me with the walls of prison


Another example is Munir Niazi's poem "Yeh kis ka lahu hai kaun mara" (Whose blood is this who died), in which he lamented the loss of life and innocence in the war. He wrote:


Yeh kis ka lahu hai kaun mara


Yeh lahu kis ki haddiyo se tapka hai yeh lahu kis ki gardan se tapka hai yeh lahu kis ki ragon se tapka hai yeh lahu kis ki ankhon se tapka hai yeh lahu kis ki zuban se tapka hai yeh lahu kis ki shah rag se tapka hai yeh lahu kis ka hai kaun mara


Whose blood is this who died


This blood dripped from whose bones this blood dripped from whose neck this blood dripped from whose veins this blood dripped from whose eyes this blood dripped from whose tongue this blood dripped from whose jugular vein this blood whose is it who died


Some other poems were more balanced and nuanced in their approach. They acknowledged the heroism and sacrifice of both sides and expressed their sorrow and sympathy for both nations. They also hoped for a better future for both countries and their people. For example, Ahmad Faraz wrote a poem titled "Shikwa-e-zulmat-e-shab se to kahin behtar tha" (It was better than complaining about the darkness of night), in which he praised the courage of both Indian and Pakistani soldiers and wished for peace between them. He wrote:


Shikwa-e-zulmat-e-shab se to kahin behtar tha


Apne hisse ki koi shamma jalaate jaatey


It was better than complaining about the darkness of night


To light some candles from our share


Woh jo hum mein tum mein qarar tha tumhein yaad ho ke na yaad ho


Wohi yaani waada nibaah ka tumhein yaad ho ke na yaad ho


That which was settled between us you remember or not remember


That same promise of loyalty you remember or not remember


Woh naadaaniyaan woh khushiyaan be sabab thi mujhe maloom hai


Magar dil ko behlane ko ghalib yeh khayaal achha hai


Those foolishnesses those joys were without reason I know it well


But to console the heart Ghalib this thought is good


Hum dono mein ik baat thi woh bhi bhool gaye tum yaad rakhna chahte thay hum bhool gaye tum yaad rakhna chahte thay hum bhool gaye


There was one thing between us that too you forgot you wanted to remember we forgot you wanted to remember we forgot


Hum dono hi fida-e-watan thay hum dono hi fida-e-watan thay hum dono hi fida-e-watan thay hum dono hi fida-e-watan thay


We both were devoted to our country we both were devoted to our country we both were devoted to our country we both were devoted to our country


Ab jo rootho ge ham se to gham na karna ab jo rootho ge ham se to gham na karna ab jo rootho ge ham se to gham na karna ab jo rootho ge ham se to gham na karna


Now if you will be angry with us then do not be sad now if you will be angry with us then do not be sad now if you will be angry with us then do not be sad now if you will be angry with us then do not be sad


Hum bhi tumhare hain tum bhi hamare ho hum bhi tumhare hain tum bhi hamare ho hum bhi tumhare hain tum bhi hamare ho hum bhi tumhare hain tum bhi hamare ho


We are yours you are ours we are yours you are ours we are yours you are ours we are yours you are ours


Urdu Prose and the 1965 War




Another form of Urdu literature that emerged during and after the 1965 war was prose. Urdu prose includes various genres such as novels, short stories, essays, memoirs, biographies, travelogues and journalism. Urdu prose writers also used their skills and talents to express their views and sentiments on the war and its aftermath. Some of these works were fictional, while others were based on facts and experiences.


Some of these works were supportive of the Pakistani cause and portrayed the heroism and sacrifice of the Pakistani soldiers and civilians. They also highlighted the atrocities committed by the Indian forces and exposed the international conspiracy against


Conclusion




The 1965 war between India and Pakistan was a watershed event in the history of South Asia and Urdu language and literature. It brought out the best and the worst in both nations and their cultural expressions. It also revealed the complexity and diversity of the Urdu literary scene, as different writers and poets responded to the war with different perspectives and styles. Some of these works were patriotic and supportive of their respective countries, while others were critical and peace-loving. Some of these works were realistic and factual, while others were imaginative and fictional. Some of these works were optimistic and hopeful, while others were pessimistic and despairing.


The 1965 war also had a lasting impact on Urdu language and literature, as it influenced the future development and direction of both. It also created a sense of awareness and responsibility among Urdu writers and speakers, as they realized the importance of their role in shaping the destiny of their countries and their people. It also challenged them to overcome the barriers of hatred and hostility, and to promote the values of harmony and coexistence. The 1965 war also inspired them to explore new themes and forms, and to enrich the Urdu literary tradition with their creativity and innovation.


The 1965 war between India and Pakistan was not only a military conflict, but also a cultural one. It was a war that tested the strength and resilience of both nations and their languages. It was also a war that showcased the beauty and diversity of both cultures and their literatures. It was a war that taught us many lessons, some bitter and some sweet. It was a war that we should never forget, but also never repeat. b99f773239


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